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Constitutionalism, Human Rights, and Islam after the Arab Spring by Grote, Rainer; Röder, Tilmann J (22nd August 2016)

Part 4 The Fragile Basis of Democracy and Development, 4.3 Centralized or Decentralized State Structures?: Tendencies in the Arab Transition States

Xavier Philippe

From: Constitutionalism, Human Rights, and Islam after the Arab Spring

Rainer Grote, Tilmann J. Röder

From: Oxford Constitutions (http://oxcon.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 10 December 2018

This chapter deals with the issue of centralization and decentralization, with a focus on Arab states facing situations of political and legal transition in the form of constitutional transformation. Countries at the heart of the “Arab Spring” revolutions of 2011—such as Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, and Libya—did not place particular emphasis on the issue of constitutional structures with a view of establishing democracy and new political regimes. Although contexts were quite different in each case, the primary aim of each revolution and uprising was to overthrow the...
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