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The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State edited by Cassese, Sabino; von Bogdandy, Armin; Huber, Peter (8th June 2017)

12 Evolution and Gestalt of the Swiss State

Benjamin Schindler

From: The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State

Edited By: Sabino Cassese, Armin von Bogdandy, Peter Huber

From: Oxford Constitutions (http://oxcon.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 26 May 2019

This chapter highlights the features and development of administrative law in Switzerland. Historically speaking, a peculiarity of the Swiss state and its administration is a lack of a monarchic past and a weakness of bureaucratic tradition. Another characteristic element of Swiss public authorities is the slow growth of their structure from bottom (municipalities, cantons) to top (federal level). Thus, Switzerland is one of the most decentralized countries of Europe. The lack of a central and bureaucratic administration means that the administrative law's emancipation in Switzerland started noticeably later than in its neighbouring countries, such as France, Germany, Austria, and Italy. The establishment of administrative courts was delayed for the same reason.

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