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The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State edited by Cassese, Sabino; von Bogdandy, Armin; Huber, Peter (8th June 2017)

3 The Administrative State in Europe

Sabino Cassese

From: The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State

Edited By: Sabino Cassese, Armin von Bogdandy, Peter Huber

From: Oxford Constitutions (http://oxcon.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 26 May 2019

This chapter examines the ‘administrative state’ and its particular expressions in Europe. Coined in 1948 by the American political scientist Dwight Waldo, the administrative state stands for the exclusive link established between the state and administration. Administrative systems and administrative law were shaped according to the needs of the various different state models; as each nation-state developed along divergent lines, administrative systems diverged too. Therefore, public administrations and their systems of administrative law were seen as final enclaves of nationalism. Each system is said to be unique to the history and traditions of a specific society, and designed expressly for the society within which it operates. As such, the chapter makes a comparison between certain divergent models of state, before delving into other trends of statehood, and finally, it examines the impact of globalisation and the European Union on the administrative state.

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