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The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State edited by Cassese, Sabino; von Bogdandy, Armin; Huber, Peter (8th June 2017)

5 Evolution and Gestalt of the Austrian State

Ewald Wiederin

From: The Max Planck Handbooks in European Public Law: Volume I: The Administrative State

Edited By: Sabino Cassese, Armin von Bogdandy, Peter Huber

From: Oxford Constitutions (http://oxcon.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 26 May 2019

This chapter presents an overview and history of the Austrian administrative state. It shows how the traditional form of the Austrian administration evolved in the second half of the nineteenth century. After defeat in World War I, the Republic of Austria succeeded the extinct Danube Monarchy; it took over the Viennese central administrative departments and their personnel and remained a ‘typical administrative state’. In the early modern period, the fundamental elements of Austria's administration developed on three different levels that still exist and to this day continue to characterize the administration's structure. Most notably, the state's dominant administrative feature is expressed by the equality of the judiciary and the administrative branch in both standing and rights.

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