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Introduction: Leverage, Sequencing, Design, and Separation—Considerations in Security Sector Reform during Constitutional Transition

Edited By: Zoltan Barany, Sumit Bisarya, Sujit Choudhry, Richard Stacey

From: Security Sector Reform in Constitutional Transitions

Edited By: Zoltan Barany, Sumit Bisarya, Sujit Choudhry, Richard Stacey

From: Oxford Constitutions (http://oxcon.ouplaw.com). (c) Oxford University Press, 2015. All Rights Reserved.date: 07 August 2020

This introductory chapter provides an overview of security sector reform (SSR). Although negotiating the new constitution is a primary element of a political transition to constitutional democracy, SSR is critical to the success of any political transition. This is especially so when the outgoing regime has relied on the security services to consolidate and maintain its grip on power and has created a strong and politicized security sector in order to undermine and suppress opposition to its rule. Indeed, SSR itself has the explicitly democratizing objective of ensuring security and justice are provided in a manner consistent with democratic norms, human rights, and the rule of law. The book studies a handful of cases of SSR during constitutional transitions to offer a sketch of what works, what fails, and what reformers and constitutional negotiators should bear in mind as they approach the project of SSR.

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